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Public Speaking Course: 

Vulnerability

Recently, while I was standing around talking to other presenters in the hotel lobby at the National Speakers Association convention, I picked up some more tips to add to my public speaking course.

John Meluso, a professional speaker, spent some time with me and noted that I was not showing any vulnerability at all near the beginning of my program.

I would roll along and then tell a signature story at the END of my talk that bared everything. John, pointed out to me that being the kind of public speaker that I am,  I have probably been alienating many of the sensitive audience members. Once alienated, those members don't hear you anymore.

It is likely that right from the start my style ran right over them, causing them to retreat for cover and making them retreat emotionally.

Because of John's astute observation, when I'm speaking I will change the order of some of my material to better connect with more subdued audience members.

Having grown up not far from Pittsburgh in Washington, Pennsylvania, and having my brains battered playing lineman in football at school at West Virginia U, I can still recall how an old boy coal miner friend of mine once told me, 'The schoolhouse door is always open.'

The vulnerability is to admit that not always can we say "Our minds be always open".

John, I want to thank you for reminding me that as we master all we learned from our public speaking course, always and in all ways, we all can get better and improve our skills.

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